Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.1156
Title: Historical techniques of lie detection
Authors: Vicianova, Martina
Issue Date: 20-Aug-2015
Publisher: PsychOpen
Abstract: Since time immemorial, lying has been a part of everyday life. For this reason, it has become a subject of interest in several disciplines, including psychology. The purpose of this article is to provide a general overview of the literature and thinking to date about the evolution of lie detection techniques. The first part explores ancient methods recorded circa 1000 B.C. (e.g., God’s judgment in Europe). The second part describes technical methods based on sciences such as phrenology, polygraph and graphology. This is followed by an outline of more modern-day approaches such as FACS (Facial Action Coding System), functional MRI, and Brain Fingerprinting. Finally, after the familiarization with the historical development of techniques for lie detection, we discuss the scope for new initiatives not only in the area of designing new methods, but also for the research into lie detection itself, such as its motives and regulatory issues related to deception.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12034/964
http://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.1156
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