Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.4985
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dc.rights.licenseCC-BY 4.0-
dc.contributor.authorWaldenmeier, Karla-
dc.contributor.authorFriederichs, Katja-
dc.contributor.authorKuhl, Julius-
dc.contributor.authorBaumann, Nicola-
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-21T07:54:19Z-
dc.date.available2021-07-21T07:54:19Z-
dc.date.issued2021-07-14-
dc.identifier.citationWaldenmeier, K., Friederichs, K., Kuhl, J., & Baumann, N. (2021). (Un)Locking Self-Motivation: Action versus State Orientation Moderates the Effect of Demanding Conditions on Self-Regulatory Performance [Data set]. PsychArchives. https://doi.org/10.23668/PSYCHARCHIVES.4985en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12034/4413-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.4985-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The present research examined whether individual differences in self-motivation (i.e., action vs. state orientation) moderate the effect of demands on self-regulatory performance. Whereas state-oriented individuals consistently show a locking effect (i.e., impaired self-regulatory performance under demands), it is empirically less clear whether action-oriented individuals need at least some demands to unlock their self-motivation potential. Method: In three studies (N1=164, N2=120, N3=113), we examined the impact of demanding conditions (Study 1: subjective listlessness; Studies 2&3: uncompleted vs. completed intention) on action- and state-oriented individuals in established self-regulatory tasks (Studies 1&2: Stroop task; Study 3: Grid task). Tasks required self-regulation when congruent Stroop stimuli were frequent (vs. rare) and target shifts in the Grid task self-initiated (vs. externally cued). Results: Across all studies, action versus state orientation moderated the effect of demands on self-regulatory performance. Action-oriented participants showed fewer errors (pStudy1=.074, pStudy2=.036) and faster self-initiated target shifts (pStudy3=.046) under moderate compared to low demands. State-oriented participants showed trends in the opposite direction. Conclusions: The findings show that action-oriented individuals do not unlock their self-motivation potential unless there is some kind of demand. This dynamic suggests that action orientation is neither good nor bad but has opposing effects under different demand levels.en
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.publisherPsychArchivesen
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/-
dc.subjectaction versus state orientationen
dc.subjectself-regulatory performanceen
dc.subjectself-motivationen
dc.subjectdemanding conditionsen
dc.subject.ddc150-
dc.title(Un)Locking Self-Motivation: Action versus State Orientation Moderates the Effect of Demanding Conditions on Self-Regulatory Performanceen
dc.typeresearchDataen
dc.description.reviewpeerRevieweden
wgl.wglsubjectPsychologiede_DE
Appears in Collections:Research Data