Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.4788
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dc.rights.licenseCC-BY 4.0en_US
dc.contributor.authorHirsch, C. R.-
dc.contributor.authorMeeten, F.-
dc.contributor.authorNewby, J. M.-
dc.contributor.authorO'Halloran, S.-
dc.contributor.authorGordon, C.-
dc.contributor.authorKrzyzanowski, H.-
dc.contributor.authorMoulds, M. L.-
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-28T11:03:54Z-
dc.date.available2021-04-28T11:03:54Z-
dc.date.issued2021-04-28-
dc.identifier.citationHirsch, C. R., Meeten, F., Newby, J. M., O'Halloran, S., Gordon, C., Krzyzanowski, H., & Moulds, M. L. (in press). Looking on the bright side reduces worry in pregnancy: Training interpretations in pregnant women [Author accepted manuscript]. Clinical Psychology in Europe. http://doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.4788-
dc.identifier.issn2625-3410-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12034/4227-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.4788-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Recent evidence suggests that anxiety is more common than depression in the perinatal period, however there are few interventions available to treat perinatal anxiety. Targeting specific processes that maintain anxiety, such as worry, may be one potentially promising way to reduce anxiety in this period. Given evidence that negative interpretation bias maintains worry, we tested whether interpretation bias could be modified, and whether this in turn would lead to less negative thought (i.e., worry) intrusions, in pregnant women with high levels of worry. Method: Participants (N = 49, at least 16 weeks gestation) were randomly assigned to either an interpretation modification condition (CBM-I) which involved training in accessing positive meanings of emotionally ambiguous scenarios, or an active control condition in which the scenarios remained ambiguous and unresolved. Results: Relative to the control condition, participants in the CBM-I condition generated significantly more positive interpretations and experienced significantly less negative thought intrusions. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that worry is a modifiable risk factor during pregnancy, and that it is possible to induce a positive interpretation bias in pregnant women experiencing high levels of worry. Although preliminary, our findings speak to exciting clinical possibilities for the treatment of worry and the prevention of perinatal anxiety.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCH receives salary support from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), Mental Health Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherPsychArchivesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.32872/cpe.3781-
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.32872/cpe.3781-
dc.rightsopenAccessen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectperinatal mental healthen_US
dc.subjectworryen_US
dc.subjectinterpretation biasen_US
dc.subjectcognitive bias mediation (CBM)en_US
dc.subjectpregnancyen_US
dc.subjectanxietyen_US
dc.subject.ddc150-
dc.titleLooking on the Bright Side Reduces Worry in Pregnancy: Training Interpretations in Pregnant Womenen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.description.reviewreviewed-
dc.description.pubstatusacceptedVersion-
zpid.sourceinfo.journaltitleClinical Psychology in Europe-
zpid.tags.visiblePsychOpenGOLD-
zpid.tags.visibleAuthorAcceptedManuscript-
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