Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.4366
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dc.rights.licenseCC BY-SA 4.0-
dc.contributor.authorvon Dawans, Bernadette-
dc.contributor.authorZimmer, Patrick-
dc.contributor.authorDomes, Gregor-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-20T08:37:17Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-20T08:37:17Z-
dc.date.issued2020-11-20-
dc.identifier.citationVon Dawans, B., Zimmer, P., & Domes, G. (2020). Dataset for: Effects of glucose intake on stress reactivity in young, healthy men [Data set]. PsychArchives. https://doi.org/10.23668/PSYCHARCHIVES.4366en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12034/3949-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.4366-
dc.description.abstractDataset for: Bernadette von Dawans, Patrick Zimmer, Gregor Domes (2020). Effects of glucose intake on stress reactivity in young, healthy men. In: Psychoneuroendocrinology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2020.105062en
dc.description.abstractThe psychobiological stress response has a broad impact on energy metabolism, while the availability of energy may, in turn, affect the stress response. Specifically, a reduced cortisol response has been found after 8-11 hours of fasting, while glucose intake has led to an increase in cortisol reactivity. We compared the effects of standardized glucose or artificial sweetener drinks, as well as water, ingested prior to a physical (cold pressor test, CPT) or a psychosocial stressor (Trier Social Stress Test, TSST) after four hours of fasting. Healthy male subjects (N = 151) were randomized to one of six groups (either glucose, sweetener or water group and stress induction with the CPT or TSST). Thirty minutes after ingestion, participants were exposed to the stressor. Repeated measures of the subjective stress response, salivary cortisol and alpha amylase as well as continuous heart rate recordings were taken to capture the psychobiological stress response. Capillary blood glucose levels were measured four times. We found significant psychobiological stress responses for all variables and both stressors, but significantly stronger responses for the TSST. Moreover, we found a significant but small effect for a slightly stronger cortisol response to stress after glucose ingestion, which is presumably driven by a more pronounced effect in the TSST compared to the CPT condition. Responder rates did not differ for the three conditions in either the TSST or in the CPT. Our results demonstrate that even after a short fasting timeframe of four hours, higher glucose availability results in slightly higher cortisol stress responses in men.en
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.publisherPsychArchivesen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2020.105062-
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2020.105062-
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/-
dc.subjectstressen
dc.subjectcortisolen
dc.subjectenergy metabolismen
dc.subjectglucoseen
dc.subjectfastingen
dc.subjectTSSTen
dc.subjectCPTen
dc.subject.ddc150-
dc.titleDataset for: Effects of glucose intake on stress reactivity in young, healthy menen
dc.typeresearchDataen
dc.description.reviewunknownen
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