Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.4226
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dc.rights.licenseCC BY 4.0-
dc.contributor.authorBackfisch, Iris-
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Jürgen-
dc.contributor.authorLachner, Andreas-
dc.contributor.authorScheiter, Katharina-
dc.contributor.authorScherer, Ronny-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-13T08:10:53Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-13T08:10:53Z-
dc.date.issued2020-10-12-
dc.identifier.citationBackfisch, I., Schneider, J., Lachner, A., Scheiter, K., & Scherer, R. (2020). Another jingle-jangle fallacy? Examining the validity of Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) self-report assessments. PsychArchives. https://doi.org/10.23668/PSYCHARCHIVES.4226en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12034/3838-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.4226-
dc.description.abstractRecent research provided evidence that teachers’ professional knowledge regarding the adoption of educational technologies is a central determinant for successful teaching with technologies (Petko, 2012). One prominent conceptualization of teachers’ professional knowledge for teaching with technology is the technological-pedagogical-content-knowledge (TPACK) framework established by Mishra and Koehler (2006). Teachers' TPACK is mostly investigated with self-report questionnaires. However, recent research suggests that the use of self-report TPACK might be challenging during interpreting the results of empirical studies (Abbitt, 2011; Joo, Kim, & Li, 2018; Fabriz et al., 2020). Therefore, the use of self-report TPACK might induce a jingle-jangle fallacy (Gonzalez et al., 2020). Jingle-jangle fallacies describe a lack of extrinsic convergent validity in two different ways: On the one hand two measures which are labeled the same might represent two conceptually different constructs (jingle fallacy). In the present case, self-report TPACK might differ from teachers’ knowledge for technology-enhanced teaching to a larger extent than previous research suggests. On the other hand two measures which are labeled differently might examine the same construct (jangle fallacy). Accordingly, self-report TPACK and self-efficacy beliefs towards technology-enhanced teaching might be similar constructs with comparable implications on teachers’ technology integration (see e.g., Marsh et al., 2020 for an investigation of jingle-jangle fallacies). Within this protocol, we preregister a meta-analysis to investigate systematically the validity of self-reported TPACK.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project is part of the “Qualitätsoffensive Lehrerbildung”, a joint initiative of the Federal Government and the Länder which aims to improve the quality of teacher training. The programme is funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research. The authors are responsible for the content of this publication.en
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.publisherPsychArchivesen
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/-
dc.subjectmeta-analysisen
dc.subjectjingle-jangle fallacyen
dc.subjectTPACKen
dc.subjecttechnological-pedagogical-content-knowledgeen
dc.subjectself-efficacyen
dc.subjectvalidityen
dc.subject.ddc150-
dc.titleAnother jingle-jangle fallacy? Examining the validity of Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) self-report assessmentsen
dc.typepreregistrationen
dc.description.reviewunknownen
dc.description.pubstatusotheren
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