Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.1682
Title: The Role of the Media in the Construction of Public Belief and Social Change
Authors: Happer, Catherine
Philo, Greg
Issue Date: 16-Dec-2013
Publisher: PsychOpen
Abstract: The media play a central role in informing the public about what happens in the world, particularly in those areas in which audiences do not possess direct knowledge or experience. This article examines the impact the media has in the construction of public belief and attitudes and its relationship to social change. Drawing on findings from a range of empirical studies, we look at the impact of media coverage in areas such as disability, climate change and economic development. Findings across these areas show the way in which the media shape public debate in terms of setting agendas and focusing public interest on particular subjects. For example, in our work on disability we showed the relationship between negative media coverage of people on disability benefit and a hardening of attitudes towards them. Further, we found that the media also severely limit the information with which audiences understand these issues and that alternative solutions to political problems are effectively removed from public debate. We found other evidence of the way in which media coverage can operate to limit understanding of possibilities of social change. In our study of news reporting of climate change, we traced the way that the media have constructed uncertainty around the issue and how this has led to disengagement in relation to possible changes in personal behaviours. Finally, we discuss the implications for communications and policy and how both the traditional and new media might help in the development of better informed public debate.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12034/1322
http://dx.doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.1682
Appears in Collections:Article

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
jspp.v1i1.96.pdf396,08 kBAdobe PDF Preview PDFDownload


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons