Other Accepted Manuscript

Trust in scientists, risk perception, conspiratorial beliefs, and unrealistic optimism: A network approach to investigating the psychological underpinnings of COVID-19 vaccination intentions

Author(s) / Creator(s)

Salvador Casara, Bruno Gabriel
Martinez-Conde, Susana
Dolinski, Dariusz
Suitner, Caterina
Genschow, Oliver
Muniak, Pawel
Kulesza, Wojciech

Abstract / Description

Using a network approach, we addressed in two studies interrelations among potential antecedents of vaccine intentions, related to both COVID-19 risk perception and epistemic beliefs (i.e., trust in scientists and conspiracy beliefs). In Study 1 and 2, we assessed a US (N = 994) and an international sample (N = 902) during spring and summer 2020. The network analysis reveals a complex interplay of factors where trust in scientists, the closest predictor of vaccine intention, is associated with conspiracy beliefs and danger perception. Furthermore, we found evidence for unrealistic optimism, with participants perceiving the risk of getting infected with COVID-19 as lower in comparison to the risk they attributed to other people. However, this bias was not associated with vaccine intention. Study 2 corroborated these results. The results call for a global change in the narrative which should highlight the epistemic authority of science in order to build a stronger trust in the scientific community. However, tackling trust in scientists needs a wider field of persuasion that includes conspiracy beliefs and risk perception factors.

Keyword(s)

COVID-19 optimism pessimism unrealistic optimism bias risk perception vaccination hesitancy cognitive illusions positive illusions conspiracy coronavirus trust in science

Persistent Identifier

Date of first publication

2022-06-29

Publisher

PsychArchives

Is version of

Citation

Salvador Casara, B. G., Martinez-Conde, S., Dolinski, D., Suitner, C., Genschow, O., Muniak, P., & Kulesza, W. (in press). Trust in scientists, risk perception, conspiratorial beliefs, and unrealistic optimism: A network approach to investigating the psychological underpinnings of COVID-19 vaccination intentions [Accepted manuscript]. Social Psychological Bulletin. http://doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.7060
  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
    Salvador Casara, Bruno Gabriel
  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
    Martinez-Conde, Susana
  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
    Dolinski, Dariusz
  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
    Suitner, Caterina
  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
    Genschow, Oliver
  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
    Muniak, Pawel
  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
    Kulesza, Wojciech
  • PsychArchives acquisition timestamp
    2022-06-29T20:39:24Z
  • Made available on
    2022-06-29T20:39:24Z
  • Date of first publication
    2022-06-29
  • Abstract / Description
    Using a network approach, we addressed in two studies interrelations among potential antecedents of vaccine intentions, related to both COVID-19 risk perception and epistemic beliefs (i.e., trust in scientists and conspiracy beliefs). In Study 1 and 2, we assessed a US (N = 994) and an international sample (N = 902) during spring and summer 2020. The network analysis reveals a complex interplay of factors where trust in scientists, the closest predictor of vaccine intention, is associated with conspiracy beliefs and danger perception. Furthermore, we found evidence for unrealistic optimism, with participants perceiving the risk of getting infected with COVID-19 as lower in comparison to the risk they attributed to other people. However, this bias was not associated with vaccine intention. Study 2 corroborated these results. The results call for a global change in the narrative which should highlight the epistemic authority of science in order to build a stronger trust in the scientific community. However, tackling trust in scientists needs a wider field of persuasion that includes conspiracy beliefs and risk perception factors.
    en_US
  • Publication status
    acceptedVersion
    en_US
  • Review status
    reviewed
    en_US
  • Sponsorship
    This research was supported by grants: 1) RID (Regionalna Inicjatywa Doskonałości Mazowsza - Regional Excellence Initiative for Masovian District): “Unrealistic optimism in the age of pandemic. Health research and ensuring safety for the inhabitants of Mazovia district” granted to Dariusz Dolinski (2020/2). 2) NAWA (the Polish National Agency for Academic Exchange) granted to Wojciech Kulesza. 3) The Polish Association of Social Psychology (PSPS Polskie Stowarzyszenie Psychologii Społecznej), junior members grant programme on COVID-19 granted to Paweł Muniak.
    en_US
  • Citation
    Salvador Casara, B. G., Martinez-Conde, S., Dolinski, D., Suitner, C., Genschow, O., Muniak, P., & Kulesza, W. (in press). Trust in scientists, risk perception, conspiratorial beliefs, and unrealistic optimism: A network approach to investigating the psychological underpinnings of COVID-19 vaccination intentions [Accepted manuscript]. Social Psychological Bulletin. http://doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.7060
    en_US
  • ISSN
    2569-653X
  • Persistent Identifier
    https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12034/6367
  • Language of content
    eng
    en_US
  • Publisher
    PsychArchives
    en_US
  • Is version of
    https://doi.org/10.32872/spb.7807
  • Is related to
    https://doi.org/10.32872/spb.7807
  • Keyword(s)
    COVID-19
    en_US
  • Keyword(s)
    optimism
    en_US
  • Keyword(s)
    pessimism
    en_US
  • Keyword(s)
    unrealistic optimism bias
    en_US
  • Keyword(s)
    risk perception
    en_US
  • Keyword(s)
    vaccination hesitancy
    en_US
  • Keyword(s)
    cognitive illusions
    en_US
  • Keyword(s)
    positive illusions
    en_US
  • Keyword(s)
    conspiracy
    en_US
  • Keyword(s)
    coronavirus
    en_US
  • Keyword(s)
    trust in science
    en_US
  • Dewey Decimal Classification number(s)
    150
  • Title
    Trust in scientists, risk perception, conspiratorial beliefs, and unrealistic optimism: A network approach to investigating the psychological underpinnings of COVID-19 vaccination intentions
    en_US
  • DRO type
    other
    en_US
  • Journal title
    Social Psychological Bulletin
    en_US
  • Visible tag(s)
    PsychOpenGOLD
    en_US
  • Visible tag(s)
    Accepted Manuscript
    en_US