Preprint

Our Versus Their Narcissist: How People View Narcissistic Persons From Their Ingroup and From a Competing Outgroup

This article is a preprint and has not been certified by peer review [What does this mean?].

Author(s) / Creator(s)

Dufner, Michael

Other kind(s) of contributor

Witten/Herdecke University

Abstract / Description

In this research we will investigate in a competitive intergroup context to what extent the perception of persons scoring high in grandiose narcissism varies depending on whether they belong to one’s own group or to an opposing outgroup. To do so, we will conduct a laboratory study, in which members of newly formed groups have direct contact with another group and compete for scarce resources. We hypothesize that perceivers ascribe targets scoring high in narcissistic admiration higher status when they belong to their ingroup versus the outgroup. Similarly, we hypothesize that perceivers like targets scoring high in narcissistic rivalry better when they belong to their ingroup versus the outgroup. We will also investigate the processes that link the two narcissism dimensions to status and likability and test whether these processes differ, depending on whether evaluations are made by ingroup or outgroup members.

Keyword(s)

narcisissm groups social identity

Persistent Identifier

Date of first publication

2021-11-17

Publisher

PsychArchives

Citation

Dufner, M. (2021). Our Versus Their Narcissist: How People View Narcissistic Persons From Their Ingroup and From a Competing Outgroup. PsychArchives. https://doi.org/10.23668/PSYCHARCHIVES.5218
  • Author(s) / Creator(s)
    Dufner, Michael
  • Other kind(s) of contributor
    Witten/Herdecke University
  • Accession date
    2021-11-17T10:30:12Z
  • Made available on
    2021-11-17T10:30:12Z
  • Date of first publication
    2021-11-17
  • Abstract / Description
    In this research we will investigate in a competitive intergroup context to what extent the perception of persons scoring high in grandiose narcissism varies depending on whether they belong to one’s own group or to an opposing outgroup. To do so, we will conduct a laboratory study, in which members of newly formed groups have direct contact with another group and compete for scarce resources. We hypothesize that perceivers ascribe targets scoring high in narcissistic admiration higher status when they belong to their ingroup versus the outgroup. Similarly, we hypothesize that perceivers like targets scoring high in narcissistic rivalry better when they belong to their ingroup versus the outgroup. We will also investigate the processes that link the two narcissism dimensions to status and likability and test whether these processes differ, depending on whether evaluations are made by ingroup or outgroup members.
    en
  • Publication status
    other
  • Review status
    notReviewed
  • Citation
    Dufner, M. (2021). Our Versus Their Narcissist: How People View Narcissistic Persons From Their Ingroup and From a Competing Outgroup. PsychArchives. https://doi.org/10.23668/PSYCHARCHIVES.5218
    en
  • Persistent Identifier
    https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12034/4631
  • Persistent Identifier
    https://doi.org/10.23668/psycharchives.5218
  • Language of content
    eng
  • Publisher
    PsychArchives
  • Is related to
    https://www.psycharchives.org/handle/20.500.12034/4629
  • Is related to
    https://www.psycharchives.org/handle/20.500.12034/4630
  • Is related to
    https://www.psycharchives.org/handle/20.500.12034/4632
  • Keyword(s)
    narcisissm
    en
  • Keyword(s)
    groups
    en
  • Keyword(s)
    social identity
    en
  • Dewey Decimal Classification number(s)
    150
  • Title
    Our Versus Their Narcissist: How People View Narcissistic Persons From Their Ingroup and From a Competing Outgroup
    en
  • DRO type
    preprint